Ali Moon

Friday, 5 October 2012

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon

Ali Moon is a Parisian photographer, now based in Perth, Australia, who also happens to be one of my mother’s friends. Of course, I wouldn’t have asked her if I could feature her work if I didn’t love it; and I’ll tell you why I love it. I’ve been talking a lot (and perhaps too much) on my blog about how I’ve been noticing a certain ‘narrowing’ of blogging content into a singular aesthetic – often, a ‘dreamy’ aesthetic. I’m not saying I don’t like this aesthetic, or that we should feel bad for liking it, that would be ridiculous. But just as I feel writing is coming second to visual content, I also think certain styles of photography and visual imagery are coming second to the ‘dreamy’ aesthetic. I love dreamy photography and readily consume it. But what I also love is diversity, as I’ve said many times.

This is why I wanted to show you Ali’s work, because she is a photographer who in my mind combines the ‘dreaminess’ I see a lot on blogs with a different perspective that is more akin to photojournalism. Maybe that’s because she’s worked with photojournalist, Stanley Greene. Or maybe it’s just her own style. We talk a lot about authenticity online, and I feel that Ali’s photography is an expression of a mode of authenticity that seeks to capture ordinary lives as narratives, whether such lives are ‘pretty’ or not.

Of course, the second reason I wanted to showcase her work here is because I firmly believe in supporting local artists in my community. My mother, who has been an independent artist for as long as I can remember, relies on the support of the local community and word-of-mouth to survive as a small business owner with my dad. I believe in people like Ali and my parents, they deserve all the help they can get.

You can read more about Ali here. She’s the director of The Moonlight Studios, which currently operates as a shop in the Fremantle Markets near the Market bar (and also near my mother’s shop!), offering professional photography packages. You can also have a look at her art photography on her other website. Plus she’s got a book collection of her photography.

By the way, thanks for all the book recommendations on my last post – please keep them coming, I love this!

All images are copyrighted to Ali Moon, please don’t re-blog without proper credit.

11 comments:

hannah debbie said...

these photos are really beautiful.

I really do wish there was more diversity in blogging content, visual or otherwise. We don't all have to like the same things, you know?

suzie said...

Thank you so much for sharing these images, they have blown me away! My understanding of 'dreamy' is the sort of thing that drives me nuts: it's the wispy girl in the meadow with a bit of sunflare for good measure that is rampant across the internet, and it's the type of photography that garners huge adulation. The really irritating part is it's often taken by someone who used a PS action as 'they love the look of film photography'. Hmm…
Ali's photos have such authenticity and something really worthwhile to say. AND shot with film, bliss!
This sort of work not only makes me feel joyous, but actually makes me feel like a terrible photographer with a lot to learn. That's a good thing, by the way.

Petra said...

these are great. dreamy and gritty at the same time. and I actually prefer the latter :)

Nit said...

This pictures are absolutely perfect. They feel real and they are striking at the same time.

Have you ever seen Hanania and Brunnquell ´La Guerre du Feu' exhibit? It's *amazing* and I don't understand how it hasn't generated more noise on the web... I like the dreamy side of photography, as you say, but it feels narrowing to only stay in there, there's such an amazing diversity in styles to enjoy and learn from.

So, thank you for showing her work!

Miss Bibliophile said...

These are beautiful. You really hit the nail on the head when you described them as combining dreaminess with photojournalism. Many of the more typically "dreamy" photos I see do make make me wish I could step into the picture, but in a somewhat obvious way. These all hint at more complex stories going on in them that I want to know more about.

Gilly said...

What I have been noticing lately is an abundance of blog readers who seem to want the bloggers life, especially if it has lovely, dreamy photography. I love that these photos offer a chance to see life through another person's eyes, not just another chance to "shop" for a lifestyle.

rooth said...

Thank you for sharing her work and making the introduction to Ali Moon. I'm also more curious regarding the stories behind the pictures and the shots - it would be quite an experience to follow her around on a shoot

Sally said...

They really remind me of road trips when I was little, the small towns we'd stop in our drive through. Beautiful stuff.

Sera said...

I have to agree with Petra - the grittiness (both in the graininess of the film and the earthy content is what makes them appealing. I also love the way that in the posed(?) portraits the subject is staring straight down the lens - I find the 'contemplative' modelling look (not that these people are models...) quite alienating sometimes.

Thanks for sharing!!

Teresa said...

Beautiful work! I love photos that tell a story.

Hila said...

hannah debbie: me too - I wish there was more diversity in what is popular too, and the kind of blogs that receive attention.

Suzie: That's how I feel when I read a really great piece of writing - it makes me feel terrible as a writer, but in a good way, because I want to work harder. Also, I agree with this so much: "it's the wispy girl in the meadow with a bit of sunflare for good measure that is rampant across the internet, and it's the type of photography that garners huge adulation." I'm so bored with the sameness on blogs. I know I've been going on about this issue, but I just feel like things are becoming stagnant and that the same old blogs and the same style of blogs are just constantly copied and gushed over. It's like we have nothing else to say but regurgitation.

Petra: I prefer the latter too :)

Nit: I haven't seen that exhibit, but thanks for bringing it to my attention. I often wonder why certain things don't get more attention on the net and blogs - it does feel like a very narrow range of styles is considered 'blog-worthy'.

Miss Bibliophile: exactly, these images aren't aspirational, they make you step out of yourself and consider things like context and other people's lives.

Gilly: I completely agree, I have no desire to 'shop' for a life.

Rooth: Ali is a well-travelled woman, I'm sure she could tell you some stories! I really admire her.

Sally: me too, only my trips were never this adventurous.

Sera: I know what you mean.

Teresa: I agree!