Trois Couleurs: Rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

trois couleurs: rouge

I could write about this film all day, but I'll spare you my more excessive admiration. Trois Couleurs: Rouge is part of director Krzysztof Kieslowski's Trois Couleurs trilogy, with each film exploring, both symbolically and aesthetically, the colours and symbolism of the French flag: Blue for liberty, White for equality and Red for fraternity. While Blue is an excellently made film which received the most critical acclaim, my favourite is Red.

This is in no small part due to the lead actress of Red: Irene Jacob. She spends much of the film bathed in red and light, waiting for a type of emancipation, family, love and self-actualisation. I also personally think that the film is a form of adaptation of Shakespeare's The Tempest, with Irene Jacob as Miranda. What I love most about this film is the way that it conveys so much of the restlessness, the anticipation, the untried desire and expectation that is often associated with youth. I remember the first time I saw it as an undergraduate student during my first year at university, I felt as if I was watching myself. The idea that you know something is coming into your life, but you can't name it. It's a sort of love affair with yourself, and so very few people have such a love affair for fear of being self-indulgent.

I'm also intrigued by the idea that love has a colour. When did we decide that red is love? There seems to be a whole cultural history to be explored with that concept alone. Kieslowski isn't afraid of love and that's part of the reason why he's my favourite director.